PDF KINDLE (The Magic of Reality How We Know What's Really True) by Richard Dawkins

A surprising number of scientists feel that Richard Dawkins does the public understanding of science real harm through his belligerent attacks on religion which turn off a good half of his potential audience but no one can doubt that he has a talent for getting science particularly biology across to a general readership This is his first attempt I live in the United States in the 21st century There is no greater danger to our species and our civilization right now than religious crazies How can we ask our businesses to change the way they do business so as to prevent climate change if half of the country doesn t believe in scientific evidence Or worse yet if they expect a big bearded man to come down and bail us out if things get too badWhat about the people who believe that the world will end in the next few years with a war in the Middle East What if their faith leads them to believe we should go to war to make this come aboutYes these are scary people and there are a lot of themI d like to think that Mr Dawkins had these people in mind when he wrote this book It may be too late for the current generation who have turned their minds off and handed over their rational thought in exchange for faith But perhaps the next generation can be saved in time and with their help we CAN actually do the work necessary to make the world a better placeFrom that perspective this is an important and incredible book It is a blow struck for logic over foolishnessBut all the way through I did find myself having mixed feelings I don t think Mr Dawkins really understands the purpose of the old myths and legends The distinction between fairy tales and mythology seems to be missing from his understanding When the old stories about the gods and nature of reality were written they were neither meant to be just so stories nor were all of them intended to take the place of science While he chooses to use the myths throughout his book to make his own book entertaining he clearly looks down on them and shows no consciousness that there is a deeper level of meaning to be found in mythology the realm of the psychological I would suggest he sit down and re read his Joseph Campbell The mythological creation of the world the end of the world the nature of mythological reality was never meant to be science It was often meant to represent the internal journey of mankindOn page 202 he writes We don t have to invent wildly implausible stories we have the joy and excitement of real scientific investigation and discovery to eep our imaginations in line And in the end that is exciting than fantasy Why do we need to eep our imaginations in line Can t we mature to the point at which we are able to partake in scientific investigation on Mondays and mythological investigation on Wednesdays Can t we be trusted to learn the difference and eep them apartScience cannot help us with uestions of existence It will never help us with How ought I act or What meaning can I find in my life What happens after we die How can I find happiness But perhaps the ancient Eros Unbound (Great Loves, knowledge allied with philosophy can be of some use with these important problemsThere are snide remarks here and there aimed at Astrology aliens and such He may be right about many of them but the attacks lack any logical depthOverall I would certainly recommend this book to any and all children of the right reading level but I would also want to talk to that child as they were reading it Maybe take them for a walk in the woods and teach them about talking to the trees There certainly is in the world we actually experience than is dreamnt of in Mr Dawkins scienceDave McKean as always is a master His artwork is well worth the price of the book all by itself He gets 16 stars I enjoyed this read very much I have read The God Delusion but that is the only other Dawkins book I have readI enjoy Dawkins right between the eyes style of writing This is a superb read very interesting and complicated science is broken down so evennuckle draggers like me can understand it To be sure I need to be clear as to WHY I like this book It s not like any of the science or reasoning in it is new or unusual or that I haven t heard many similar reasonings here or there all the way from high school physics courses all the way to certain and strange movies I ve enjoyedWhy I do love this book is simple it s clear concise and it does a very admirable job of setting up magical thinking in all its flavors against the fundamentals of scienceIt s a great primer I think I would have loved reading this when I was 13 or 14 It might have even sparked my interest in science even than I had been sparked but that might not be possible Science Fiction did a perfectly admirable job in that department with Heinlein and Asimov as my tutorsEven so apart from the things I ve heard about of Dawkins this is relatively mild in the religion bashing He uses logic and reasoning postulating clearly and setting up the universe as it is not as we wish it would be He also makes sure that Occam s Razor is uite sharpI certainly have no complaints about this book assuming I wanted a basic primer of courseAs for being an adult reading this It s charming It s somewhat magical in the sense that I draw a sense of wonder about the universe and our living within it For that alone I would recommend it as a bit of light reading assuming you re up to your science snuff I m a big fan of Dawkins ever since reading The Selfish Gene many many years ago However I was very disppoin. Magic takes many forms Supernatural magic is what our ancestors used in order to explain the world before they developed the scientific method The ancient Egyptians explained the night by suggesting the goddess Nut swallowed the sun The Vikings believed a rainbow was the gods’ bridge to earth The Japanese used to explain earthuakes by conjuring a gigantic catfish that carried the world on its back earthuakes occurred each time it flipped its tail These are magical extraordinary tales But there is another ind of magic and it lies in the exhilaration of discovering the real answers to.

LympusI liked it a lot and started wondering about truth gods superpowers and religions you now as all children do at some pointSo I started asking uestions and the answers I received being born in a country where than 80% are orthodox the I was convinced that one of the best ways someone could get closer to the Truth and be able to better understand the world around us would be to become a priestBeing a respectable goal to pursue my mother and grandparents although none were regular churchgoers encouraged me to do so So I picked up a Bible and started reading it only to discover it was full of metaphors and words that as a child I couldn t understand so I got bored and put it down nonetheless retaining my faith in a higher powerYears passed by and after the 8th grade national exam I got in at a very good high school in my small town in a class with a STEM specialization focusing on Information Technology and MathematicsI was the odd duck from the class who excelled at English foreign language and Romanian the national language of the country I was born in I wrote poems depicting my teenage angst and some short prose speaking of which I m sure I d get a good laugh if I d discover my writings I still liked to read but my reading habits as far as I can remember just exited the era of Jules Verne s works and gravitated towards books like Oliver Twist White Fang Robinson Crusoe and so on But my reading habits were about to change due to a totally unexpected factor my new girlfriend We were classmates and she was a rare combo one of the smartest and cutest the best if you re perchance reading this review she liked to argue a lot She was way better than me in STEM but I had the edge in humanities She introduced me to J K Rowling Frank Herbert Carl Sagan and I really looked up to herSo when she told me she was an atheist and I told her I was a believer well the two hormonal teenage universes clashed and although I can t exactly remember there is about a 100% chance we had an expletive filled fight about itBut with all our differences we cared about each other and continued being together for a few yearsMore than her looks and academic smarts I appreciated the books we shared and her astuteness in conversationWe talked about anything and everything debating pros and cons It didn t matter if the subject was asinine or something crucially important like would someone after being subjected to teleportation be the same person or merely a clone of the original She pushed me out of my comfort zone stretched my mind and I loved her for itBut belief was a touchy subject Although I went to church only at special occasions throughout the year I considered myself a believer But I also considered myself a smart person who liked to read and ask uestions to better understand the UniverseBut what if those uestions started to elicit uncomfortable emotionsWhich identity would prevail thenuestions like Why is there than one religionHow can you tell that you believe in the right oneWouldn t the time of your existence in history the place you were born in andor your parents influence your choice of religion than your free willIf there is a God then why are bad things happening to good people and so onHad it been out then this book would have been the perfect gift for meIn fact if I could travel back in time I d gift it to my secondary school self though I m sure he would only partially understand it then travel a bit forward and hand it to my high school selfBe a ind person and gift this book to people who are curious and like to ask uestionsI had to realize on my own through reading books having interesting conversations and just plain living that people are creatures of habit that we act on an emotional than logical basis that there are a throng of cognitive biases which continuously incapacitate our decision making and obstruct our evolution And make no mistake changing one s mind is strictly a personal journey But should we tolerate our faults by recognizing our limitations we can make tremendous progress and see the beauty of the Universe not through n interpretations of unchanging ancient texts but through the lens of the only incrementally self actualizing instrument scienceJesus this turned out to be a bit personal This was the worst popular science book that I have read It was lazily written with no real structure rather than flimsy chapter beginnings with myths The information in it was extremely random and superficial I m sorry to say this but it is nothing than a rant of a famous person than a popular science book with an aim to inform its audience I used to enjoy Dawkins books back in the day when they were about topics which he has a good grasp of ie evolution But I really don t like what he has become since then a figurehead basically who does not refrain from giving his opinion on any topic at all For example his speculation about auto immune diseases in the book shows that he really did not understand them very well yet it did not stop him from talking about them The beauty of science is that it never really needs to defend itself The proofs it comes up with always speak for themselves When you understand them thoroughly you will be convinced anyway So the science does not need Champions it convinces by evidence But somehow over the last 10 years Mr Dawkins became a self proclaimed champion of science which as a professional researcher irks me The language content and style of this book added to my dislike of him as a popular figure. He world’s most famous evolutionary biologist and one of science education’s most passionate advocates has spent his career elucidating the wonders of science for adult readers But now in a dramatic departure he has teamed up with acclaimed artist Dave McKean and used his unrivaled explanatory powers to share the magic of science with readers of all ages This is a treasure trove for anyone who has ever wondered how the world works Dawkins and McKean have created an illustrated guide to the secrets of our world and the universe beyond that will entertain and inform for years to come.

PDF KINDLE (The Magic of Reality How We Know What's Really True) by Richard Dawkins

Ted in this book which is so basic that it shouldn t contain surprises for anyone who graduated from high school There were no surprises and nothing really new the most interesting part for me was how each chapter is introd 45 I already read too much fiction this month so i would try with some academic book This book is so good Dawkins made it uite fun most parts of this book aren t boring at all The way he narrated this book is really humble he isn t patronized us the reader and he admitted that he still didn t understand some part and somehow made himself eual to the reader of course he isn tHowever i found a few other parts of the book is a little bit boring Like the atom part the explanation is uite longI found many interesting information in this book like how to measure time in fossils with radioactive clocks using uranium 238 sun and it s mythology and also the uestion i ve always wanted to now who is the first person on earth And the idea that auto immune disease could be a weapon to fight cancer is really fascinating This book ends with my favorite chapter about several miracles and the possibility that really happened at that time Well done Dawkins I would totally read all of your books The Magic of Reality How We Know What s Really True Richard DawkinsThe Magic of Reality How We Know What s Really True is a 2011 book by the British biologist Richard Dawkins with illustrations by Dave McKean The book was released on 15 September 2011 in the United Kingdom and on 4 October 2011 in the United States It is a graphic science book aimed primarily at children and young adults Dawkins has stated that the book is intended for those aged around 12 years and upwards and that when trialling the book prior to publishing younger readers were able to understand its content with additional adult assistance 2017 1392 I am still sizzling with delight over my latest Dawkins read having soaked up its information like a hungry sponge It leaves the reader totally awed and dazzled with the world I m humming with it The birds plump with protons and neurons atoms and molecules are singing louder than ever in the garden and that amazingly mysterious and wonderful star that we call the sun roaring away converting hydrogen to helium shines even brilliantly in the blue sky as we make a sedate path round it s circumference twirling round and round on our axis at a giddy rate of 1000 miles per hour Thank goodness for the stickiness of gravity and Mother Earth s determination to La Stratgie du camlon keep us clasped to her bosom Ahhhhh this book has made me so happy At last a book giving a fantastic overview of science that I can easily understand I obviously have the science age of a 12 year old the age group that everyone says the book is geared towardsSomething is wrong in my lauding of this book though Dawkins wouldn t like it The term Mother Earth smacks of anthropomorphism and he ain t having any of it In fact a good fifth of the book is dedicated to the recounting of various myths from around the world including what he considers the Christian myth and at the end of every segment on myths Dawkins goes on to show how science is better Much much better than mythIn fact I mentioned I was reading this book to a neighbour and he said Yeah Dawkins that s the guy whoeeps banging on against God To have a scientist and communicator of the calibre of Dawkins referred to in those terms is I think terrible but he has bought it upon himself He just cannot live and let live In fact I have changed my mind about what I said in the above paragraph I have since read the Wikipedia article on Creationism see the paragraphs headed Creationism internationally the large number of people who support the idea of Creationism it is very good that Dawkins is arguing against it But I still don t like a lot of his other criticisms and uips against religion Taken from Richard Dawkinsnet Anyway to get back to the science This book is amazing I learnt tons and loved every minute of reading it The chapters have headings which speak for themselvesand also illustrate well the age group Dawkins is appealing toWho was the first personWhy are there so many different Personality Selling kinds of animalsWhat are things made ofWhy do we have night and day winter and summerWhat is the sunWhat is a rainbowWhen and how did everything beginAre we aloneWhat is an earthuakeThere isn t one single diagram in the book He does it all with words but he is an incredibly brilliant writer and it is utterly memorable and fascinating Time and time again he wrote about things that I d previously only half understood and made them crystal clear I feel hugely grateful to him Highly recommended As a wee child no I m not Scottish I just like how wee sounds I was introverted and could rarely feel at ease while playing with other childrenUnfortunately that was a problem because being human I also didn t enjoy being left out of activities All that changed when I discovered the magic of reading books no I didn t turn into a robot from the Dungeon DimensionsNow don t get me wrong I wasn t a hermit and got my periodic dose of socialization yup sounds cringeworthy it s just that I felt at ease with a book because I could travel to new worlds identify with heroes and villains see with my mind s eye fictitious or real wonders yup way entertaining than the games children usually playWhile in secondary school I started with reading folk and fairy tales and at some point got to a book whose title would be loosely translated as The Legends of the These uestions It is the magic of reality sciencePacked with clever thought experiments dazzling illustrations and jaw dropping facts The Magic of Reality explains a stunningly wide range of natural phenomena What is stuff made of How old is the universe Why do the continents look like disconnected pieces of a puzzle What causes tsunamis Why are there so manyinds of plants and animals Who was the first man or woman This is a page turning graphic detective story that not only mines all the sciences for its clues but primes the reader to think like a scientist as wellRichard Dawkins

Richard Dawkins ò 9 characters


10 thoughts on “PDF KINDLE (The Magic of Reality How We Know What's Really True) by Richard Dawkins

  1. says: PDF KINDLE (The Magic of Reality How We Know What's Really True) by Richard Dawkins

    PDF KINDLE (The Magic of Reality How We Know What's Really True) by Richard Dawkins Richard Dawkins ò 9 characters Free read ↠ E-book, or Kindle E-pub ò Richard Dawkins ‭The Magic of Reality How We Know What's Really True Richard DawkinsThe Magic of Reality How We Know What's Really True is a 2011 book by the British biologist Richard Dawkins with illustrations by Dave McKean The book was released on 15 September 2011 in the United Kingdom and on 4 October 2011 in the United States It is a graphic scien

  2. says: PDF KINDLE (The Magic of Reality How We Know What's Really True) by Richard Dawkins

    PDF KINDLE (The Magic of Reality How We Know What's Really True) by Richard Dawkins Free read ↠ E-book, or Kindle E-pub ò Richard Dawkins Richard Dawkins ò 9 characters To be sure I need to be clear as to WHY I like this book It's not like any of the science or reasoning in it is new or unusual or that I haven't

  3. says: PDF KINDLE (The Magic of Reality How We Know What's Really True) by Richard Dawkins Free read ↠ E-book, or Kindle E-pub ò Richard Dawkins

    PDF KINDLE (The Magic of Reality How We Know What's Really True) by Richard Dawkins A surprising number of scientists feel that Richard Dawkins does the public understanding of science real harm through his belligerent attacks on religion which turn off a good half of his potential audience but no one can doubt that he has a talent for getting science particularly biology across to a general readership This is his first attempt at a children's book or rather a 'family' book as it is aimed at a wider readership and it has m

  4. says: PDF KINDLE (The Magic of Reality How We Know What's Really True) by Richard Dawkins Richard Dawkins ò 9 characters Free read The Magic of Reality How We Know What's Really True

    Free read ↠ E-book, or Kindle E-pub ò Richard Dawkins Richard Dawkins ò 9 characters Free read The Magic of Reality How We Know What's Really True I am still sizzling with delight over my latest Dawkins' read having soaked up its information like a hungry sponge It leaves the reader totally awed and dazzled with the world I’m humming with it The birds plump with protons and neurons atoms and molecules are singing louder than ever in the garden and that a

  5. says: Free read The Magic of Reality How We Know What's Really True Richard Dawkins ò 9 characters PDF KINDLE (The Magic of Reality How We Know What's Really True) by Richard Dawkins

    PDF KINDLE (The Magic of Reality How We Know What's Really True) by Richard Dawkins I'm a big fan of Dawkins ever since reading The Selfish Gene many many years ago However I was very disppointed in this book which is so basic that it shouldn't contain surprises for anyone who graduated from high school There were no surprises and nothing really new the most interesting part for me was how each chapter is introduced with an example of a myth that people have made up to explain some natural phenomenon

  6. says: Free read ↠ E-book, or Kindle E-pub ò Richard Dawkins Richard Dawkins ò 9 characters Free read The Magic of Reality How We Know What's Really True

    PDF KINDLE (The Magic of Reality How We Know What's Really True) by Richard Dawkins I live in the United States in the 21st century There is no greater danger to our species and our civilization right now than religious crazies How can we ask our businesses to change the way they do business so as to prevent climate change if half of the country doesn't believe in scientific evidence? Or worse yet if they expect a big bearded man to come down and bail us out if things get too bad?What about the people who believe that the

  7. says: Richard Dawkins ò 9 characters Free read ↠ E-book, or Kindle E-pub ò Richard Dawkins PDF KINDLE (The Magic of Reality How We Know What's Really True) by Richard Dawkins

    Richard Dawkins ò 9 characters PDF KINDLE (The Magic of Reality How We Know What's Really True) by Richard Dawkins As a wee child no I'm not Scottish I just like how 'wee' sounds I was introverted and could rarely feel at ease while playing with other childrenUnfortunately that was a problem because being human I also didn't enjoy being left out of activities All that changed when I discovered the magic of reading books no I didn't turn into a

  8. says: Richard Dawkins ò 9 characters Free read ↠ E-book, or Kindle E-pub ò Richard Dawkins Free read The Magic of Reality How We Know What's Really True

    Free read ↠ E-book, or Kindle E-pub ò Richard Dawkins PDF KINDLE (The Magic of Reality How We Know What's Really True) by Richard Dawkins Richard Dawkins ò 9 characters 45 ⭐I already read too much fiction this month so i would try with some academic book This book is so good Dawkins made it uite fun most parts

  9. says: PDF KINDLE (The Magic of Reality How We Know What's Really True) by Richard Dawkins

    PDF KINDLE (The Magic of Reality How We Know What's Really True) by Richard Dawkins I enjoyed this read very much I have read The God Delusion but that is the only other Dawkins book I have readI enjoy Dawkins right between the eyes style of writing This is a superb read very interesting and complicated science is broken down so even knuckle draggers like me can understand it

  10. says: Free read ↠ E-book, or Kindle E-pub ò Richard Dawkins PDF KINDLE (The Magic of Reality How We Know What's Really True) by Richard Dawkins Richard Dawkins ò 9 characters

    PDF KINDLE (The Magic of Reality How We Know What's Really True) by Richard Dawkins This was the worst popular science book that I have read It was lazily written with no real structure rather than flimsy chapter beginnings w

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